Elementary School Journal

Is there something I don’t know or understand that would make it easier to accept the kind of indoctrination that goes on in the classroom I’m attached to?

It may be a sort of arrogance born out of my own privileged, creative education that makes me see this place as a graveyard for young minds and souls. I have no proof that my ideals would serve these kids better than what they’re getting. And this may be a kind of toughening process that helps the children deal with the world they’re going into better than my soft, curiosity-based system.

Form and Function/Here is a sloth. State the form and function of the arms. Don’t linger on the image out of interest./Make the point and move on to plants./Review for the test: Function of each part, roots, petals, stamen, leaves, pistil, sepals. Fill out the sheet so we can be done with plants./Later we’ll finish with crawfish and be done with them. /Be still and do your work. The sooner you’re done the sooner we can move on.

Write I come to school ready and prepared to work. Write this 25 times. If you talk we’ll make it 25 more.

What I hear in this is: Boredom is the price of this thing called Education./I am as bored with this as you are. We are stuck here so let’s get through it till we’re released./Learning is important and will make you better people later on./The world is made of dead, isolated parts. The more you master these dead parts to better you are at “school.”

We ask children to obey an external authority that requires them to be quiet, still, and attentive, but we do nothing to help them develop their inner capacity to be quiet, still, or attentive. On the contrary, we paper the classroom walls with posters, slogans, rules, and isolated bits of information so that everywhere their eyes come to rest they find more random data. The sheer quantity of visual stimulation overwhelms the meaning that might be found there and actively counteracts the goal of increasing the attention span. We give students an abundance of data, but no guidance on how to find meaning.

I’ve made some notes about how I might teach these children if it were my position to do so, but I’ll hold back on writing them out. It’s easy for me to smear the well-intentioned efforts of others who have given themselves to this hard work as a career, when I am only a visitor, dropping in and out for short periods. To the extent I fail to acknowledge the affection that’s communicated by the teachers to the students, I ask forgiveness.

Like the rest of us, these children will create or discover meaning in their lives as best they can according to what their spirits, their families, the community and the times allow. If I can breathe life in the classroom, if I can hold them, their teacher, and the school in the light of love and faith, that will be my contribution.

 

The Rocking Boat

billowing golden clouds

The boat is rocking. Which way should I lean?
Should I hold tight to the boat, be one
with the boat, have faith that the boat will hold us
as it was made to do?
Or should I try to level the boat? When other riders
jolt from side to side, try to direct our course, should I join with those who counter their every move
with equal force?
And the water—
the waves carrying us the gods know where,
raising, then negating what’s under us,
and water gathering around
our feet, at first a bother and now, deepening,
it becomes a third force in the boat—
it seems willing to take us down as one.

I remember how I once loved being in a boat.
I knew fear then, too, but greater than that I knew
a trust in my companions. Together,
balancing, moving in and on the waters
which held our bulky forms so lightly we
laughed, and had to wonder….